tumblinwithhotties:

Johnny Diesel (gifs by leprinceofsins)

thegooddoctorisin:

lilpocketwolx:

geekishchic:

It’s not the biggest collection in the world, and the rarest game he has tops out at around $600, a far cry from the thousands of dollars some rare games are reported to be worth.

So what makes his collection so special? It’s all about the aesthetics, dude. Norton’s 5,200-game collection is meticulously alphabetized and displayed so everyone can enjoy it in all its spectacular glory. “I suppose I’d have to consider myself a Nintendo fanboy. I grew up in the 1980s. Nintendo and Mario was everywhere, there was no escaping it,” Norton recalled. “From Sunday morning cartoons, cereal, underwear, bed sheets and lunch boxes.

Nintendo makes fantastic games and has enduring franchises. It is without a doubt my favorite company.” “I’ve acquired a ton of games, but I don’t feel like I’ve spent a ton. Most people don’t realize that many of these classic games can be found for $1 - $4 each,” he dished. “It’s all about finding the right deal at the right time. Hunting out your local area. Finding extras games for cheap and trading online.

To me collecting has become a fun game in and of itself.” “I’d say I have most of the rare games for most systems,” he went on to say. “To be honest it may be easier to mention the hard-to-find games I don’t have.

For the NES I own a complete licensed set, except for the very hard-to-find Stadium Events. My Super Nintendo, Nintendo 64 and Gamecube sets are complete as well, except for the two mail-order Super Nintendo competition carts. I also own a complete set for Virtual Boy, Sega Game Gear and Sega 32x. I’m working on finishing up my Sega Master System, Game Boy and Game Boy Color sets.” X

#all of the consoles

I got the chills from this, I tip my hat to you good sir

This was really cool at first, but then it bece extremely adorable when you see his kids playing together c:

(via saturdaypeople)

fastcompany:

The future of higher education is a constantly moving target.
Everything from the emergence of MOOCs to new learning styles and mounting financial and sustainability pressures are impacting the education landscape. Every day higher education leaders are developing new strategies to leverage across these developing challenges and opportunities.
The common denominator amidst all this change: students. What should they learn? How can institutions best attract them? How do you best empower their learning? How do you keep them safe? What do they value? These aren’t new questions but the answers are shifting rapidly. The questions are also becoming more critical for our educational institutions given the National Center for Education Statistics report revealing in 2012, for the first time in three decades, demographics predicted a diminishing population for college age students in the United States.
Here are five bold predictions for how the answers to those questions will define the future of education.
Read More>

fastcompany:

The future of higher education is a constantly moving target.

Everything from the emergence of MOOCs to new learning styles and mounting financial and sustainability pressures are impacting the education landscape. Every day higher education leaders are developing new strategies to leverage across these developing challenges and opportunities.

The common denominator amidst all this change: students. What should they learn? How can institutions best attract them? How do you best empower their learning? How do you keep them safe? What do they value? These aren’t new questions but the answers are shifting rapidly. The questions are also becoming more critical for our educational institutions given the National Center for Education Statistics report revealing in 2012, for the first time in three decades, demographics predicted a diminishing population for college age students in the United States.

Here are five bold predictions for how the answers to those questions will define the future of education.

Read More>

policymic:

23 ways feminists have made the world better for women

It may seem like a bizarrely obvious statement, but somewhere between earning women the right to vote, pushing through legislation opening up universities to female students and advancing the Civil Rights movement (to name just a very few examples), feminism has indeed made life much, much better (and as a result, happier) — not just for American women, but American men as well. Far removed from the stereotypical and inaccurate image of the bra-burning activist, feminists have proven time and time again that women’s rights are human rights. And as the Declaration of Independence so elegantly points out, the ideals of life and liberty are intrinsically tied up with that third pursuit: happiness. 

Read the full list | Follow policymic

(via huffingtonpost)

daniel-the-human:

shordibynature:

trappedblackrose:

where is this at?

I need to go to this place

Isn’t this universal Orlando? Which I’m going to visit in just 3 weeks :D

I want to go?

as-cool-as-an-attempted-suicide:

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

Me

Love. This. Movie.

(via stuckin8bit)

oh-baby-its-alex:

the-goldengirls:

Requested by: frontier001

I saw this and burst into tears oh my god

(via alexandermott)